Wednesday, January 07, 2015

And...We're Back! Jumpstart Your Genealogy Education in 2015 with New Genealogy Boot Camps

Are you ready to learn some new skills or recharge your genealogy research in 2015? Then check out the two January Boot Camps Thomas MacEntee and I will be offering:  Research Right - Tracking and Evaluating Your Genealogy Research Boot Camp and Getting Started with Scrivener Mini Boot Camp.


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Research Right – Tracking and Evaluating Your Genealogy Research Boot Camp – 17 January 2015




Schedule

Saturday 17 January 2015
Duration: 3.5 hours (with a 30 minute break)

11:00 am EST /10:00 am CST
Welcome / Meet & Greet
11:15 am EST / 10:15 am CST
Using and Managing a Genealogy Research Log
Thomas MacEntee

12:30 pm EST/11:30 am CST
Break

1:00 pm EST /12:00 pm CST
Citing Sources and Evaluating Evidence

Thomas MacEntee
2:30 pm EDT / 1:30 pm CDT

Closing and Thank You


Do you struggle with tracking your genealogy research and staying organized? Do you have trouble finding an image or document you downloaded last week? And what about source citations . . . do you panic when it comes time to document your research?
You are not alone. More and more genealogists and family historians have a strong desire to break bad habits and research using more efficient methods. The Research Right Boot Camp offers a simple way to track research, cite sources and analyze data before it gets added to your genealogy database software.
Through this special Boot Camp you’ll learn not just better research habits but tips and tricks to become a better researcher.

  • Learn how to use a research log that suits your research habits.
  • Understand the basics of source citations and become efficient at creating citations on the fly.
  • Maintain good research habits and adapt them when encountering new records sets.
  • Learn how to state a proof, evaluate evidence and reach a conclusion for each specific data points on records.
Duration: 1.5 hours11:00 am EST /10:00 am CDT

Register:

Reserve your spot athttp://hackgenealogy.com/research-tracking-evaluating-genealogy-research-boot-camp-17-january-2015/


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Getting Started with Scrivener Mini Boot Camp - 31 January 2015



Schedule

Saturday 31 January 2015
Duration: 1.5 hours
11:00 am EST /10:00 am CDT
Getting Started with Scrivener

Lisa A. Alzo, M.F.A.



Just what is this program called Scrivener* that everyone keeps talking about? And how can you use it for your genealogy and family history projects? Scrivener by is a combination word processor and project management tool that’s affordable and simple to use. Priced under $50, this powerful application seamlessly takes you from idea to outline to finished product. Whether you are a blogger, an aspiring author, or a genealogist looking to share your family history findings, Scrivener can help you plot, organize, and publish your writing.
Already using Scrivener? You might be surprised at even some of the “secrets” you may not know that are important for a solid understanding of how to make Scrivener work for you. Here’s what you’ll get from this new Boot Camp:
NOTE: It is highly recommended that you download the free trial version of Scrivener (Available for Mac or Windows) before the boot camp in order to maximize your learning experience. Visit the Literature and Latte web store at http://www.getscrivener.com for your free trial.
With the Scrivener Mini Boot Camp you’ll receive 1.5 hours of educational content for a special low price of $7.95! You’ll receive an extensive handout, a special Scrivener “freebie” created by instructor Lisa Alzo, as well access to the recorded version of the webinar for up to one year!
Register by Monday, 26 January 2015 and receive $3 off the registration price for a low $4.95! Space is limited and if you register but can’t attend, you’ll still receive the handout, the freebie and access to the recording!
Register 

Copyright 2015, Lisa A. Alzo and Thomas MacEntee
All Rights Reserved

Wednesday, December 31, 2014

2014 Year in Review: Looking Back and Moving Forward

Is it just me, or did 2014 zoom right on by? In just a few hours, it will be 2015, and it is time to review where I have been, and turn my energy and outlook to where I hope to go in the coming year.



Last year, I did not blog about specific goals.  Instead, I wrote that I wanted to embrace a theme of “Focus and Selectivity” for 2014.  [See “2013 Year in Review: Lucky or Unlucky?”]. 

So…How did I do? 

2014 seemed like such a whirlwind.  On the plus side, I was always busy and never without an abundance of work; on the minus side—I was always busy and often overworked.  Being self-employed presents unique challenges including self-discipline, time management, self-motivation, and more. There is also a huge degree of uncertainty—worrying about getting the next writing or teaching assignment, or speaking engagement, meeting enrollment minimums for courses, selling books and other products to make sure there is a steady stream of royalties/income.

I left my 2014 goals general on purpose: They can be summarized as follows: Focus more on my writing, spend time with the people I love, and try to enjoy more of the good things in life. I did well in the writing area. I have not counted them, but I wrote a substantial number of magazine articles.  I published my own QuickSheet on Scrivener, and wrote a guide on Teaching College and Online Education Programs for GenBiz Solutions™.  I also wrote two new courses for the National Institute for Genealogical Studies. Lecturing was another way I spent my time in 2014. I presented at numerous genealogy conferences that took me to Salt Lake City, Richmond, San Antonio, Burbank, as well as other locations in Ohio, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, and Wisconsin, and I taught at the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy. I presented more webinars than I ever have, and also presented for Family Tree University’s two virtual conferences. 

In addition, I continued my partnership with Thomas MacEntee, presenting several genealogy Boot Camps on topics such as Blogging, Self-Publishing, and Evernote for Genealogy. I was also an instructor for his new Genealogy Intensive initiative. The first offering of my course, “The Write Stuff: Build Your Family Writing Skills,” (Fall 2014), sold out in 3 days! [Note: I am starting a new session of this Writing Intensive on Monday, 5 January 2015—there are just a few seats left for anyone who would like to improve their family history writing skills.  Click here to register].

As for the personal goals, I did make time for family and friends, but it didn’t seem to be enough.  I need to work on doing better in this area.

So, yes…it has been quite a year, and I am only now able to catch my breath—for a day or so before I start work on 2015 projects.  Did I accomplish everything I set out to in 2014? No.  I wanted to blog more, wanted to publish a kindle version of my book Three Slovak Women, and still haven’t finished a lingering nonfiction book project (I took baby steps in 2014, but need to take the BIG steps in 2015 to finally get it done). I plan to ramp up my writing in 2015—articles, books, guides, blog posts…you name it.  And, venture more into self-publishing. As a genealogist, I will also be participating in the Genealogy Do-Over starting 2 January 2015 (see my post “Embracing My Mistakes: Why I Am Participating in the "Genealogy Do-Over" in 2015”].

My Theme for 2015

For 2015, I have settled on the theme of MOVE/MOVEMENT.  I feel a huge need to move more, both in my personal and professional life. I have divided the “Movement” theme into four categories:

Physical – More exercise.  I love to walk, so I plan on doing more of it in 2015. Besides the health benefits, walking helps me to clear my head and think through ideas.

Mental  – I must move out of the space of negative thinking, and of listening to a lot of the “noise” that is out there in the world and on social media. 

Location – One of my hopes is to relocate somewhere other than where I currently reside. I have one specific locality in mind, but am leaving my options open.

Productivity – I must move to a place of more fulfilling work for better and more consistent pay. One of the keys to doing this is to thinking less like a creative and more like an entrepreneur.

Thank you 2014, it has been an interesting year, but I am ready to MOVE on to 2015!


Copyright, 2014, Lisa A. Alzo
All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, December 30, 2014

Embracing My Mistakes: Why I Am Participating in the "Genealogy Do-Over" in 2015


Hey world, I'm not perfect, and neither is my genealogy. But, I'm getting a chance to be better in 2015, and it is called the "Genealogy Do-Over."

Image Credit: Thomas MacEntee

When my colleague and friend, Thomas MacEntee, first informed me of his plans to launch a 13-week Genealogy Do-Over, on 2 January 2015, (please read his post on Geneabloggers), I immediately said, “I’m in!”

I never intended to become a genealogist.  When I began exploring my family history more than 25 years ago, I thought that the process would simply be a means to an end.  I was focused on being a writer, studying for my Master of Fine Arts Degree in Nonfiction Writing at the University of Pittsburgh, and I needed a topic for my thesis. Enter genealogy. I began asking my mother questions about my grandparents and my Slovak/Rusyn heritage. And so it began. [For more information, read my post The Accidental Genealogist from 2 July 2006]. I wrote my thesis about my grandmother’s immigration story, and eventually turned my thesis into a book, Three Slovak Women.

Three Slovak Women. Image Credit: Lisa Alzo

When I began exploring my roots, genealogy was pretty much a solitary activity.  I didn't know how or where to start, and I couldn't Google the answer. There was no Ancestry.com, no FamilySearch website, and no Ellis Island Database. Because there was no World Wide Web, I spent long hours in libraries and traveling to repositories, writing letters/requests for records, and chasing down relatives to interview.  Eventually I connected with a few other genealogists thanks to queries in publications and by joining the Czechoslovak Genealogical Society International. I didn't have a genealogy database (I did my Pedigree charts by hand). I fumbled my way through the research, winging it as I went along. I made my share of mistakes, including blindly collecting names, buying too much into family lore, and neglecting to cite my sources. Now I have an opportunity to for a "Take Two."  


Why Do the Do-Over?

Why would I want to put aside 25 years of research to start again? Well, I haven’t lost my mind, and it is not because I desire to “follow the crowd.” Here are my personal reasons for wanting to make a fresh start with my genealogy. 

1. Accountability.  Recognizing all of the errors I made as a “newbie,” I view this exercise as a cathartic process during which I embrace my mistakes and learn from them to become an even better genealogist.

2. See the Holes in My Research. With all of the starts and stops in my research over 25 years I have more holes than I can count.  With more thorough and thoughtful research practices, I hope to fill them in. With a research log I will be able to keep better track of what, when, where, and how I search.

3. Documentation and Proof Analysis. When I first began my research, I had to document the key sources I consulted to prepare
 a bibliography for my thesis. Did I record source citations for every single document or piece of information I found?. No (I only recorded those that made it in to the final document).  Did I use the proper format as designated for genealogy? No. Did I conduct a thorough analysis of each and every record?  Not always.

4. Gain a Deeper Understanding of My Ancestors. I was never about just gathering names, dates, and places.  I always wanted “the story.”  And I did get the “stories” for many of my ancestors, but some of them still remain a mystery.  I want to learn more about those ancestors. I would like to develop a better knowledge of who they were, and as a result, have a deeper understanding of who I am.
5. Walking the Walk. As a genealogy writer, instructor, and lecturer, I share research tips, techniques, and advice.  My audience often includes many beginners.  I want to be a good example to those who read my articles, attend my seminars and webinars, or take my courses.


One of the best aspects of this Genealogy Do-Over is that you can make the experience your own. There is a schedule of topics that outlines suggested tasks for each week, and an interactive collaborative group on Facebook for connecting and sharing with others who are participating in the 13-week journey, but nothing is mandatory.

If I Knew Then, What I Know Now…

My ancestry goes back to Eastern Europe. When I began genealogy, finding information “over there” was challenging and difficult. My choices were to: 1) Travel to Slovakia myself (something I was not in a position to do at the time, but have since done—see “Sojourn in Slovakia”); 2) Hire a researcher (which can get expensive), or 3) Rely on the microfilms that could be ordered from the Family History Library.  While I was able to do option #3, and view church records from my ancestral villages, there were a limited number of records available.  Now, most of the records I previously viewed are online and there are also new collections that have been digitized and put online at FamilySearch and other websites.

Documenting My Journey

While I won’t be sharing publicly every step of my own journey, I will focus my posts on some of the common myths and misconceptions in genealogy and how I worked through them. 

I am preparing in advance for the Genealogy Do-Over by setting up a new database in my genealogy software program, customizing my research log template, and creating a special notebook in Evernote where I will store notes, and other important documents and materials. 


I want to make 2015 my best genealogy year ever. I can’t wait to get started!


Copyright 2014, Lisa A. Alzo
All Rights Reserved

Saturday, December 27, 2014

Whose Story Will You Explore in 2015? New Session of The Genealogy Writing Intensive Begins 5 January

Have you been putting off writing that family history?  Do you want to make 2015 the year you finally tell your ancestors’ stories?  Perhaps you have doubts or fears about how to get started, what to write about, or how to craft a compelling narrative. If so, then join me for a new session of The Write Stuff: Build Your Family Writing Skills,  Genealogy Intensiveoffered through HackGenealogy.com. In this six week, interactive course (5 January - 9 February 2015), you will build your skills as a writer and learn about the tools and techniques to produce a quality family history.




The Fall 2014 version of The Write Stuff sold out in 3 DAYS!  Reserve your spot now by clicking here to register.

Why Am I Doing This?

As avid genealogists, we collect names, dates, places, and sources, and these are all essential to us learning about who we are. But a total family history is so much more just charts and graphs, boxes and lines, or references. Writing about our ancestors and our heritage gives context, meaning, and purpose to all of the facts we have collected, and I want to help you to learn how to lose the intimidation and let go of your fears about writing so that you can dig deeper into your family stories. As a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh’s Creative Nonfiction Writing program, I learned from many of the best in the business, and I have spent years building my own career as freelance writer. I want to share my experience with you.

Why the “Intensive” Concept?

In the genealogy field, there are countless opportunities for learning about what records are available and how to search them. In addition, there are many study groups out there to help you build upon the methodology and research practices. However, when it comes to writing, there is not the same in-depth type of instruction readily available. Even presentations given at conferences and via webinars are typically only lectures that will “tell” you about some of the key techniques, but don’t always “show” you what to do (I know this because I have given many of these presentations). With six weeks of concentrated focus in this “intensive” format, you will receive “take away” assignments to put into practice what you learn, and get the kind of one-on-one interaction with the instructor that is not always possible in a conference or webinar setting.

Specifically, in “The Write Stuff” experience, you will:
  • Learn writing skills and techniques to produce a quality family history
  • Build on the skills each week.
  • Focus on getting a working draft.
  • Receive constructive and helpful feedback.
  • Learn to overcome fears and anxiety about writing.
  • Have fun!

Through on-line instructional sessions, weekly assignments, and collaboration with other participants, attendees will have access to an instructor with more than 23 years of writing experience, who will teach key nonfiction writing techniques used to produce a “can’t put down” family history that will keep the pages turning for generations.

The intimidation-free learning environment will offer you the chance to find your voice, and write without worry or fear that you are doing something wrong. You will learn the essential skills you need to be accurate and thorough in your writing while maximizing your creativity!

The cost to attend a The Write Stuff Genealogy Intensive™ over a six week period is $129 per person. A special discounted price of $99 will be available during the early registration period.

Click here for more details and to register. But don’t delay…there are only a limited number of seats available, and you will want to be sure to get the early bird discount. 

I hope you will join me so I can help you to stop worrying and start writing!


[Disclaimer: I have been hired as a freelance instructor this intensive by HackGenealogy, and I will be receive payment for leading this intensive.]

Friday, November 21, 2014

Genealogy Boot Camp: Special Holiday Edition! Saturday 29 November 2014

What do you get when you combine two educators who love to share their knowledge about genealogy, with a holiday theme, and some really great prize giveaways?  

The answer is: The Hack Genealogy Holiday Special Boot Camp to be held online on Saturday 29 November 2014  from 7:00 – 10:30 pm Eastern / 6:00 – 9:30 pm Central.  

I am pleased to be co-hosting this event with my colleague, Thomas MacEntee.  

If you've attended one of our boot camps before, or have watched the recordings, then you are familiar with our approach: High quality instruction and handouts delivered in an intimidation-free environment.  If you haven't yet experienced Boot Camp, here is a great opportunity to check it out.  

But don't delay...there are only 500 seats available.  And, did I mention we are giving away prizes?


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Here is the official announcement for the the Holiday Boot Camp from Hack Genealogy:

holiday specia boot campl
We have a very special Boot Camp experience for you this year. In celebration of our first year providing these exciting and fun genealogy education events, and to get into the holiday spirit, Lisa and I are holding our very first Holiday Special Boot Camp!
We realize that starting in late November and through December, it can be difficult to schedule anything related to genealogy. That’s why you won’t find many genealogy conferences or even online events to attend. Most genealogists are busy preparing for Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Christmas and even Festivus (December 23 if you forgot). And while these events often involve family stories and relatives asking about family history, we tend to push the education aspect aside. Well not this year.

A Good Old-Fashioned Variety Show

Lisa Alzo and Thomas MacEntee
Do you remember watching variety shows on television as a kid? Here in the United States, we had weekly shows hosted by Ed Sullivan, Carol Burnett and others. But around Christmas, there would also be “holiday specials” by stars such as Bob Hope, Sonny and Cher, The Carpenters and The Osmond Family.
Sure, looking back now they may seem odd or even hokey, but there was something about them that made Christmas and other holidays seem special. And they covered just about everything, right? Some music, some funny skits, some storytelling, some Christmas carols.
So in the spirit of the holiday season, we’ve decided that this month’s Boot Camp won’t focus on just one topic as we’ve done in the past. The Holiday Special Boot Camp will cover a variety of topics, some selected by Lisa, some of my favorites, and some submitted by you, the attendees! And wait until you see what we have in store! This Boot Camp is so unusual, and not like previous events, that we should be calling it the Un-Boot Camp! 

A Different Time, A Different Price, A Whole Different Boot Camp

So do you want to join us for some holiday fun and also learn some new genealogy tips and tricks? Here’s what you need to know:
Title: Holiday Special Boot Camp
Topic: 
Grab Bag!
Date: 
Saturday 29 November 2014
Time: 
7:00 – 10:30 pm Eastern / 6:00 – 9:30 pm Central
Price: 
PYWY
Join us on the Saturday after Thanksgiving for this special event when Lisa and I will share our knowledge of genealogy with you, we’ll have a few laughs and maybe even sing a few songs! And we’ll have contest and door prizes too!
To register, click hereThere are only 500 spaces available.
Otherwise, you can watch the recording starting on Monday 1 December 2014. And as an incentive, we’ll be giving away special prizes for those who watch the recording!

What is PWYW?

So how much does all this cost? Is it free? Well, it is sort of free. Normally, the full price for a Hack Genealogy Boot Camp is $12.95 with an early bird discount of $9.95. With that you receive 3.5 hours of live instruction, over 20 pages of handouts and templates, and access to the recordings.
Since this month’s Boot Camp uses a different format and since we’ll be covering a variety of topics, we’ve decided to use a Pay What You Want model. This means that you decide how much this knowledge is worth to you. You can donate $5, $10, the regular $12.95 or even more. We know some people will likely throw in a few dollars just to say thanks for making the Boot Camp concept available. It doesn’t matter what you pay or if you pay. Lisa and I just want you to come ready to learn and to have fun.
After you register you’ll see a Donate button and we’ll keep that button active between now and even after the Holiday Special Boot Camp. And those who just watch the recording may want to contribute, especially once they realize they’ve learned some new genealogy tricks. Click here if you would like to make your donation right now.





[Note:  25% of the proceeds will go to the Preserve the Pensions project initiative of the Federation of Genealogical Societies]


Copyright, 2014 Lisa A. Alzo
and HackGenealogy
All Rights Reserved

Wednesday, October 01, 2014

Build Your Family History Writing Skills with New Genealogy Intensive

I’m passionate about writing my family history.  How about you? If, you feel compelled to tell your ancestors’ stories, but have doubts or fears about how to get started, what to write about, or how to craft a compelling narrative, then join me for The Write Stuff: Build Your Family Writing Skills, a new Genealogy Intensive offered through HackGenealogy.com. In this six week, interactive course (13 October – 17 November, 2014), you will build your skills as a writer and learn about the tools and techniques to produce a quality family history.



Why Am I Doing This?

As avid genealogists, we collect names, dates, places, and sources, and these are all essential to us learning about who we are. But a total family history is so much more just charts and graphs, boxes and lines, or references. Writing about our ancestors and our heritage gives context, meaning, and purpose to all of the facts we have collected, and I want to help you to learn how to lose the intimidation and let go of your fears about writing so that you can dig deeper into your family stories. As a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh’s Creative Nonfiction Writing program, I learned from many of the best in the business, and I have spent years building my own career as freelance writer. I want to share my experience with you.

Why the “Intensive” Concept?

In the genealogy field, there are countless opportunities for learning about what records are available and how to search them. In addition, there are many study groups out there to help you build upon the methodology and research practices. However, when it comes to writing, there is not the same in-depth type of instruction readily available. Even presentations given at conferences and via webinars are typically only lectures that will “tell” you about some of the key techniques, but don’t always “show” you what to do (I know this because I have given many of these presentations). With six weeks of concentrated focus in this “intensive” format, you will receive “take away” assignments to put into practice what you learn, and get the kind of one-on-one interaction with the instructor that is not always possible in a conference or webinar setting.

Specifically, in “The Write Stuff” experience, you will:
  • Learn writing skills and techniques to produce a quality family history
  • Build on the skills each week.
  • Focus on getting a working draft.
  • Receive constructive and helpful feedback.
  • Learn to overcome fears and anxiety about writing.
  •  Have fun!


Through on-line instructional sessions, weekly assignments, and collaboration with other participants, attendees will have access to an instructor with more than 23 years of writing experience, who will teach key nonfiction writing techniques used to produce a “can’t put down” family history that will keep the pages turning for generations.

The intimidation-free learning environment will offer you the chance to find your voice, and write without worry or fear that you are doing something wrong. You will learn the essential skills you need to be accurate and thorough in your writing while maximizing your creativity!

The cost to attend a The Write Stuff GenealogyIntensive™ over a six week period is $129 per person. A special discounted price of $99 will be available during the early registration period.

Click here for more details and to register. But don’t delay…there are only a limited number of seats available, and you will want to be sure to get the early bird discount. 

I hope you will join me so I can help you to stop worrying and start writing!


[Disclaimer:  I have been hired as a freelance instructor this intensive by HackGenealogy, and I will be receive payment for leading this intensive.]

Sunday, August 17, 2014

Book Review: Mind Maps for Genealogy

As a freelance writer, one of the questions I’m often asked is “How do you come up with your ideas?”  Sometimes I find it difficult to give a clear-cut answer because it’s not something I can easily explain.  Most of the time what I initially have is a “mish-mash” of ideas, thoughts, and examples.  I then dump them all into something called a “Mind Map – a diagram used to represent words, ideas, tasks, or other items linked to and arranged around a central key word or idea.

I have been using mind mapping for a number of years to visually plot out research problems and to generate ideas for articles, books, and presentations.  Plenty of books have been written on the subject, including several by Tony Buzan (who coined the term) .

When it comes to using mind maps for genealogy, I've seen a few presentations at conferences, watched some webinars, and have read articles [I even wrote an article about the topic: see “Mind Maps: Free Your Mind,” Internet Genealogy Magazine, October/November 2012].  

Therefore, I was my interest was piqued when I learned about a new book, 
Mind Maps for Genealogy, Enhanced Research Planning, Correlation and Analysis by author and educator, Ron Arons, that explains the concept specifically for genealogy and family history.

I was asked to review the book and my review follows below.


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Book Review: Mind Maps for Genealogy: Enhanced Research Planning, Correlation and Analysis 

The following is a review for the book Mind Maps for Genealogy: Enhanced Research Planning, Correlation and Analysis by Ron Arons, Oakland, California: Criminal Research Press, 71 pages, published 2014. $26.95 (includes shipping and handling).

The book is available for purchase from the author at: https://www.ronarons.com


Image courtesy of Ron Arons



Contents

In Mind Maps for Genealogy: Enhanced Research Planning, Correlation and Analysis, Ron Arons covers in detail how genealogists can use mind mapping to create a visual road map for idea generation and genealogical problem solving. Arons starts the book with a basic history and overview of the mind mapping concept, and also explains mind mapping terminology.  The author points out how people learn and think differently from each other and discusses how mind maps allow you to plot, view and analyze facts and relationships in more creative, visual ways than other commonly used methods such as timelines, spreadsheets, maps, and even genealogy software programs. Arons also talks about how genealogists can use mind maps to identify missing data, sort out inconsistent or conflicting data, and solve “brick wall” research problems. 

While Arons certainly does a thorough job covering the basics, he also goes a step further to show real examples of how apply the process of mind mapping to such concepts as The Genealogical Proof Standard , Inferential Genealogy , Cluster Research/FAN Club Principle , and more. 

In an Appendix section, the author provides two sample mind maps based on example research problems from two of the biggest names in genealogy: Elizabeth Shown Mills (Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation & Source Usage – QuickLesson 11)  and Dr. Thomas W. Jones (Mastering Genealogical Proof). This visual illustration of evidence laid out in mind map parent and child nodes shows how you can effectively use mind maps to solve perplexing problems in your own research.

One of my favorite parts of the book is the section on “Entire Life-Focused Genealogy” where Arons uses his own research example to walk the reader through the entire mind mapping process (brainstorming, planning, keeping a research log, correlation, and analysis)  to explore the life of Isaac Spier who served time in Sing Sing Prison for bigamy.

Mind Mapping Tools

The number of mind mapping tools and apps currently available for use is quite extensive. In his book, Arons focuses on just two major mind mapping software programs – FreeMind and Xmind,which for years have been the two most popular FREE programs that run on both PCs and Macs. For each, he explains shows beginner/getting started and advanced views. Arons does mention other programs such as SimpleMind, MindJet, Coggle, and more. 

Appendix I covers “Considerations for Selecting a Mind Map Program or Service.”
On a personal note, I was somewhat disappointed to see that he did not mention my favorite program Scapple (Literature and Latte) . However, to be fair, Scapple is not heavily marketed as a mind mapping program, but I use it extensively for this purpose. 

Other Considerations

My only reservations about this book have to do with the production quality. In my personal opinion, a more substantial cover (perhaps glossy, or a harder card stock)  would greatly improve the book's appeal. Also, many of the screenshot images would appear better if captured at a higher resolution.

Conclusion

If you have been wondering about how mind maps could help you with your genealogy research or writing Mind Maps for Genealogy is just the book to help get you started. The book provides an excellent overview of the mind mapping process, is easy to read, and includes great examples, recommendations, and resources. I highly recommend it to anyone looking for a new way to display, analyze and correlate research data, or who wants to tap into fresh ideas for family history writing.

[Disclaimer: I was asked by the author to provide a review of this book.  I purchased the book myself and have not received any form of compensation for this review].